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Coffee Etiquette at Work

17 Jun 2014
Karen Kerr

We all know office etiquette is important and bad manners at work can be bad for business by negatively affecting employee morale and productivity. It can be tough to navigate the social etiquette surrounding the break room - for example I shall not steal someone else’s food - these regulations can often be a minefield of social faux pas.

Coffee Etiquette

If you spend sleepless nights spent torturing yourself over office politics of tea and coffee etiquette, have no fear – Eden Scott is here to shed some light on this controversial subject matter.

In an ideal world; we would be allowed to make a cup of tea or coffee for ourselves and not worry if the ‘cuppa’ being made for you is the right colour consistency, temperature and most importantly… the correct beverage. However we often don’t live in an ideal world and slipping out of the room with your ‘Superman’ themed (or equally novel) mug unnoticed has become a thing of the past.

If you have succumb to the allure of instant coffee - the correct etiquette would be to take a round robin approach and this unfortunately means mass producing cups of tea and coffee for your office. Once completed said round; you can proceed to play the ‘name and shame’ card with the subtle ‘I could really go a cup of cha’. If you are not comfortable with demanding what is rightfully yours then I would advise you to get in touch to discuss working in a more coffee friendly environment.

Stay upbeat and don’t get disheartened – you will always have that one individual that’s hard to please, no matter how much you tweak the milk to water ratio – you will always be found wanting. To cope with your failure; pretend you don’t see them taking their mug back to the kitchen and adopt the ‘it’s not you; it’s them’ approach.  When placing an order of coffee with no sugar, expect the double take ‘was that coffee with sugar?’… Be patient – we’ve all been there.

Whenever possible; adopt a laissez faire approach to the tea/coffee round rather than the dictatorship path. Avoid at all costs as this dark path leads you down to hostile written schedules where coffee tasks are assigned and rotated.

Essentially if you want to impress the office learn the art of making tea/coffee to the liking of your colleagues and above all; start with boiling the kettle. The rest will fall into place.

Author

Karen Kerr
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